Single-hand War Axe with Ebonized Haft

wideThis is the final axe in a series of three hand forged, single-hand war axes I’ve been finishing.  Like the previous two axes, this axe is patterned after the many examples of late 10th to early 11th century single-hand war axes.  This type of axe was an agile yet brutal weapon that would have been a common choice for a soldier fighting in close quarters or in a shield wall. ……………………………………………………………………………………………..

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This axe features a 1018 low-carbon steel body and eye socket and a 1080 high-carbon steel bit. The body and eye were drawn out like a “bow tie.”  The two sides were forge welded together to form the body.  The eye was further refined by forging over a steel mandrel to arrive at the desired socket shape. ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

shapinghaft

The hardwood haft is made from hand hewn oak. Careful attention is given to the grain direction. Having the grain run parallel with the head (edge to poll) helps to prevent cracking when a powerful cut is made.  I use rasps and scrapers to shape the top of the haft to a tight fit with the eye socket.  This helps to prevent the axe head from twisting or moving during use. ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

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The wedge is pre-fit to the top of the haft to create the correct amount of widening to secure the head to the haft.

Once the top of the haft is correctly shaped for the socket, I carefully saw a slot for the wedge.  The wedge is cut from the same section of wood as the haft so the grain direction and size will be similar to the haft.  The wedge is then pre-fitted to the slot.  This creates a mushrooming of the haft above the top of the axe head that secures the head in place. …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

tannicacidapplication
Tannic acid and iron acetate are applied to the haft.  The two solutions react in the fibers of the wood staining it black

The haft was also ebonized to give it a faux bog oak appearance.  This process, which I explain in my essay “Making Your Own Bog Oak Axe Haft,” deeply stains the wood fibers giving the haft the inky black appearance of bog oak.  Unlike regular wood stains, this process occurs in the wood fibers and creates a much more durable finish. …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

click to enlarge images:

Specifications:

  • Body and Eye: 1018 low carbon steel
  • Edge Bit: 1080 high carbon steel
  • Haft wood: Oak
  • Blade Length (toe to heel of bit): 3.875″ (9,84 cm)
  • Axe Head Length (edge bit to poll): 5.375″ (13,65 cm)
  • Haft Length: 28″ (71,1 cm)
  • Overall Length: 29.875″ (75,9 cm)
  • Axe Head Weight: 0.84 pounds (381 grams)
  • Weight: 1.5 pounds (678 grams)

Price: $635 (plus shipping) SOLD

If you are interested in purchasing this axe, contact me at eric@crownforge.net or ericmycue374@comcast.net.

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